Lisa Wilkinson

Lisa Wilkinson of the Sunday Project interviews Melissa Leong

Personalities

Lisa Wilkinson receives an emotional response from MasterChef judge Melissa Leong in her upcoming interview with The Sunday Project, after asking the star about the racism she has faced.

Reminding the judge of an incident earlier this year, Wilkinson asked Leong how she felt when her MasterChef co-star, Jock Zonfrillo, defended her when someone made a particularly racist comment.

“Jock posted a comment left by someone. It was a particularly racist comment, were you glad Jock said that, “Wilkinson asked.

“Being a white man calling for racism is important,” Leong replied. “You know Jock has become such a dear friend, he’s one of my working husbands and he’s just a great human being in terms of how he sees other people, that there is a perfect example there. ally.

Earlier this year, Jock posted a comment referring to Melissa as a “gook,” a horribly racist remark.

“She’s actually Melissa, she’s my working wife, my sister, my partner… She’s a woman from a different background from yours, but why are you so scared? Zonfrillo wrote.

“I’m sorry for you that you can’t see past someone’s skin color or in fact the fact that he’s just different from your white a ** in any way.

Wilkinson then asked if Leong experienced racism growing up.

“Yeah absolutely. I think as a kid you just want to be accepted by the people around you and mostly me. I can vividly remember the times in my childhood in school when I was called names and I had to come home and ask mum what that means and have a parent explain what racism means, it is something you will not forget. replied.

“How did your parents deal with this?” the host asked.

“I mean my parents are Chinese so they are very realistic about things and emotions are not really in the foreground of how to explain things so they just said that’s what it means , and that’s why it was said but don Don’t mind it just be who you are and erase it. It is only later in life that you reflect on your experiences and realize the impact they may have had.

Wilkinson then asked the increasingly emotional Leong if the memories “stayed close enough” to her.

“Yeah, it’s tough as a human being, I’m proud to be resilient, to be competent and to overcome any challenges that I have,” Leong explained. “I think it’s important to be vulnerable and to pay attention to your emotions. If my childhood experiences helped me grow strong, then I can articulate those experiences and maybe tell people who have been through the same thing that they are not alone.

“I mean my parents are Chinese so they are very realistic about things and emotions are not really in the foreground of how to explain things so they just said that’s what it means , and that’s why it was said but don Don’t mind it just be who you are and erase it. It is only later in life that you reflect on your experiences and realize the impact they may have had.

Wilkinson then asked the increasingly emotional Leong if the memories “stayed close enough” to her.

“Yeah, it’s tough as a human being, I’m proud to be resilient, to be competent and to overcome any challenges that I have,” Leong explained. “I think it’s important to be vulnerable and to pay attention to your emotions. If my childhood experiences helped me grow strong, then I can articulate those experiences and maybe tell people who have been through the same thing that they are not alone.

Lisa Wilkinson delivers a scathing message to Gladys Berejiklian

TV host Lisa Wilkinson slammed the New South Wales government for refusing to make face masks mandatory amid a deadly second wave of COVID-19 in Victoria.

The seasoned presenter targeted Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian in a tweet on Saturday after a grocery run near her home in Sydney left her stunned.

“I just did some shopping at the local IGA and was literally the only buyer wearing a mask,” she wrote.

Lisa Wilkinson, 60, is pictured holding a face mask amid the coronavirus pandemic

Ms Wilkinson targeted New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian in a scathing tweet (pictured) on Saturday after a grocery run left her stunned

“When I politely asked the only one of the three masked employees at the checkout what the store’s policy was, she said, it’s up to us. ”

The project host tagged Ms. Berejiklian and said, “Gladys, I don’t think your message is getting through. ”

Ms Berejiklian has been criticized for refusing to follow Victoria’s lead and make face masks mandatory.

NSW recorded ten new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, with 111 people currently hospitalized in the state to fight the virus.

The public overwhelmingly agreed with Ms. Wilkinson’s comments.

New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian addresses the media in Sydney on Wednesday 5 August. She has been criticized for refusing to make face masks mandatory.

Ms Wilkinson, 60, has made her position on face masks clear in NSW in a series of tweets over the past month

“The compelling message was ‘not mandatory’, unfortunately. If there has been any learning in this whole situation, it’s that people won’t do anything that bothers them for the greater good, ”one woman wrote online.

“Hello from Victoria… aren’t we a prime example of why things need to be prescribed and enforced? another commented.

Victoria had more than 7,600 active cases as of Sunday afternoon, with 394 new cases and 17 deaths recorded.

Prime Minister Daniel Andrews has enforced the use of face masks in public spaces in Melbourne, with fines of $ 200 if residents are caught without one.

Ms Wilkinson also retweeted pro-mask comments as the state’s COVID-19 situation worsens.

Ms Wilkinson, 60, made her stance on face masks clear in New South Wales in a series of tweets over the past month.

Last week she wrote: ‘So I went today to my local Woolies in NSW, and I think there were maybe ten percent (if that) of the customers wearing masks. And before asking, yes, I was wearing mine.

The reporter also retweeted pro-mask comments as the state’s COVID-19 situation worsens.

Ms. Berejiklian maintained that the state was on “high alert” and told residents to be vigilant.

“The developments in Victoria mean that we have to be extremely careful,” she said last week.

Anyone with even the mildest symptoms is encouraged to get tested to avoid a second wave of new infections. Pictured is a woman wearing a mask in Darling Harbor in Sydney

“The health of our citizens and our economy must be protected – and health boards say this is the best way to do it.

“We will also further limit the reasons why Victorians can seek exemptions to enter New South Wales. ”

While the daily number of new cases is relatively low compared to the horror outbreak in Victoria, many remain a mystery, raising fears of a wave of community transmission in the days and weeks to come.

“This is a critical time in NSW’s response and we must reduce any further risk of seeding cases from Victoria,” Dr Kerry Chant, NSW director of health, said on Friday.

The country’s death toll is on track to surpass 300 as Victoria recorded her deadliest day on Sunday,

About 31,681 tests recorded until 8 p.m. Saturday, compared to 24,421 on Friday. In the photo, a woman is tested at a pop clinic in Rushcutters Bay, in the eastern suburbs of Sydney

While federal health officials remain confident a vaccine will be found, National Deputy Chief Medical Officer Nick Coatsworth said Australia currently has only “two blunt tools” to fight the virus.

“Tools like extreme social distancing and the Fourth Stage restrictions that are in place in Victoria at the moment,” he told reporters in Canberra on Sunday.

“As we prepare, as we test vaccines, as we prepare for the possibility of a vaccine, we must at the same time keep our distance. ”

Ten of the 17 Victorian deaths confirmed on Sunday were linked to elderly care outbreaks. There have also been 394 new confirmed Victorian COVID-19 cases.

The latest deaths have brought the national death toll to 295 and the Victorian death toll to 210, and the growing death toll shows no sign of abating.

But in Victoria, which is the national epicenter of the latest outbreak, police are still imposing a high number of fines for violations of coronavirus restrictions.

Masked pedestrians outside Sydney Town Hall station on August 3

“This is … the kind of behavior that will mean this second wave will last longer than it should,” Victorian Prime Minister Dan Andrews warned Sunday.

Federal Agriculture Minister David Littleproud lamented the situation in Victoria, which erupted just as it appeared the virus was becoming under control across the country.

“We prepared for victory and it was snatched from us by the actions of a few,” he told Sky News’s Sunday Agenda.

“It just shows how vulnerable we are to this virus and that every protocol must be followed. ”

Some Victoria state MPs, including Treasurer Josh Frydenberg, who is currently undergoing two weeks of quarantine in Canberra so he can attend the next sitting of Parliament from August 24, have criticized the management of the epidemic by the Andrews government.

Scientists at the University of Queensland are working on a vaccine candidate that has since evolved into human trials
Scientists from the University of Queensland are working

on a vaccine candidate that has since evolved into human trials

But shadow deputy treasurer Stephen Jones said there are clearly problems in the elderly care sector, most of which is overseen by the federal government and other sectors.

“When there is a crack in the dam and everyone is working around the clock to make up for it, I don’t think this is the time when we should be looking into who is responsible for placing the crack in the dam. dam, ”he told reporters.

Meanwhile, Western Australia’s Finance Minister and Senator Mathias Cormann has flipped around in support of WA Premier Mark McGowan’s decision to close the state border to everyone, except in special circumstances.

“This situation has changed. People’s ratings have changed, ”Senator Cormann told ABC’s Insiders.

“Considering what is happening in Victoria and the situation in the country, we support the current arrangements at state borders, including here in Western Australia.

LATEST CORONAVIRUS FIGURES IN AUSTRALIA

* Victoria recorded 394 new cases of COVID-19 and 17 more deaths on Sunday, her deadliest day yet.

* The latest casualties include two people in their 50s and bring the state’s death toll to 210 and the national total to 295.

* Ten of the 17 deaths were linked to elderly care outbreaks, while more than 2,700 confirmed Victorian-era cases still have no known source and remain a major concern.

* Nearly 1,000 Victorian-era healthcare workers are also suffering from COVID-19.

* Deputy National Health Director Nick Coatsworth said development of a COVID-19 vaccine was proceeding at a “very exciting pace”, but Australia currently only has “two blunt tools” to fight against the virus: extreme social distancing and fourth stage restrictions.

* Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews believes the state’s current case numbers reflect “the end of stabilization that was the product of the Third Stage rules” as well as the mandatory use of the mask for people leaving the house.

* NSW recorded just 10 new infections in the 24 hours through 8 p.m. Saturday, including a health worker in northern Sydney who worked August 6 from 11 a.m. to midnight while infectious .

* Queensland has gone for a fourth straight day with no new cases. However, hundreds of people caught partying on a beach in the state’s far north could face criminal charges for violating the restrictions.

* The Queensland border closure went into effect at 1 a.m. on Saturday, wreaking havoc at level crossings with more than 140 cars waiting to be returned.

* A man with just one day of mandatory quarantine to travel to the Northern Territory was fined $ 5,000 after being caught sneaking early.

* The harsh COVID-19 border closure in Western Australia has deterred 99% of normal traffic from eastern states from entering the state, Premier Mark McGowan said.

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