Keisha Lance Bottoms

Keisha Lance Bottoms biography

Personalities

Keisha Lance Bottoms (born January 18, 1970 in Atlanta) is an American politician. She has been mayor of Atlanta since January 2, 2018.

Keisha Lance Bottoms Biography

Childhood and education

Keisha Lance is the daughter of Major Lance, author and performer of Rhythm and blues, and Sylvia Robinson2,3. She grew up in Atlanta4. She graduated from Frederick Douglass High School, then received a BA in Communication from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University and a Law degree and Juris Doctor from Georgia State University College of Law 2, 5.

Political career

From 2010 to 2018, she served on the Atlanta City Council. On December 5, 2017, she was elected mayor of the city in the second round against Mary Norwood (en) 6,7 and took office on January 2, 20188.

Her name is put forward as a possible running mate of Democrat Joe Biden for the November 2020 presidential election. As such, her management of the Covid-19 health crisis, then the demonstrations in her city against the police violence suffered by the community black, were particularly popular.

Private life

Keisha Lance married Derek Bottoms, a lawyer, in 1994 at Ben Hill United Methodist Church in Atlanta9. The couple adopted a girl and three boys.

10 things to know about Keisha Lance Bottoms, mayor of Atlanta and potential “VP” of Joe Biden

Black rights protests and the coronavirus crisis suddenly brought the low-key Democratic mayor of Atlanta to the forefront. To the point of making her a serious contender for the post of vice-presidential candidate.

Keisha Lance Bottoms is the rising figure of the Democratic camp, to the point of having his chances as Joe Biden’s veep for the US presidential election. Here are 10 things to know about the mayor of Atlanta.

1. “I can’t protect you”

This evening of May 29, the situation escalates. Looters are at work, the windows of the CNN building have been smashed. The mayor calls a press conference and speaks, without notes, for just over 4 minutes. “Yesterday, when I heard there were rumors of violent protests in Atlanta, I did what a mother would. I called my son and said, ‘Where are you? I can’t protect you. ” This violence, she said, “is not in the mind of Martin Luther King.” Right words, raw emotion… Joe Biden, and many others, are amazed.

2. Blue flu

The “blue flu”, or “blue flu”, is rife when police officers are made to wear pale to express their discontent. This is what happened after one of their own, Garrett Rolfe, was charged. The cop had been fired from the police after killing Rayshard Brooks, a black man, with two bullets in the back. He will now have to be accountable to justice. The mayor welcomes this: “Things are changing in this country and we cannot remain deaf. When there are problems, we have to respond to them very quickly. ”

3. “Stay home! “

She stood out on the national scene, by imposing from March 23 an “order to stay at home” (“stay at home”) to fight against the coronavirus. Banal? She acts as Republican state governor Brian Kemp drags his feet. Bottom line, three months later: she was the one who was right. Georgia, due to the laxity of its governor, is experiencing more than 1,000 new cases of infection a day. But Kemp, a Trump protégé, doesn’t care: on June 11, despite the upsurge, he again relaxed the confinement rules.

4. Major Lance

His father, Major Lance, was a boxer turned dancer and singer-songwriter of Rythm & Blues, author of the famous hit “Um, Um, Um, Um, Um, Um”. He opened for a Beatles tour in 1964. But in 1978 he was convicted of a cocaine deal and spent three years in prison. “This experience changed my life,” says Keisha Lance Bottoms, “it pushed me to study law and choose public service. Major Lance died in 1994, aged 55. Elton John, it is said, was at his funeral.

5. A mayor named Keisha

The first time Keisha Lance Bottoms had introduced himself to Barack Obama, then a simple city councilor, he had settled for a sober “Good for you” (“bravo”). But this November 2, 2018, when she finds Obama in a rally in support of Stacey Abrams for the post of governor of Georgia, it is a star who addresses him: “When we exercise our right to vote, not only Atlanta can have a mayor named Keisha, but Georgia can have a governor named Stacey, ”she said. Abrams will narrowly lose.

6. Moderate

Former lawyer, then judge, she displays a centrism perfectly compatible with that of Biden. That didn’t stop her from facing Trump with the ball in mind on immigration: she was one of the first major city mayors to sign an executive order ending the city’s detention in the city jail. undocumented minors arrested by the immigration police. While Georgia law prevents it from declaring Atlanta a sanctuary city, nothing prevents it, she notes, from making it a “welcoming city” for immigrants chased by the administration.

7. “Mac N Cheese”

How do you turn a culinary disaster into a triumph? Easy, even if that means giving in to the prevailing sexism. When the mayor posts a photo of a Christmas dinner with a frankly disastrous looking “Mac N Cheese” on Twitter, all the cooks fall for her. Never mind, Lance Bottoms is putting the laughs on his side by launching a campaign against hunger on a national TV show: “More than Mac.” When she posts a photo of her sweet potato fries, no one giggles.

7. “Mac N Cheese”

How do you turn a culinary disaster into a triumph? Easy, even if that means giving in to the prevailing sexism. When the mayor posts a photo of a Christmas dinner with a frankly disastrous looking “Mac N Cheese” on Twitter, all the cooks fall for her. Never mind, Lance Bottoms is putting the laughs on his side by launching a campaign against hunger on a national TV show: “More than Mac.” When she posts a photo of her sweet potato fries, no one giggles.

8. Early

Bingo! She was the first major city mayor to declare her support for Joe Biden and has been campaigning for him over and over again. After the losses to Iowa and New Hampshire, when Biden’s campaign seems to be on the verge of collapse, she runs the TV shows, recalling that the South Carolina primary has not yet taken place and that “the South has a say ”. “She was with Joe Biden before it was cool to be with Joe Biden,” notes Tharon Johnson, a longtime political adviser.

9. Jim Clyburn

The most powerful black elected official in Congress, who helped Joe Biden win his state’s primary, South Carolina – a turning point against Bernie Sanders – has a soft spot for the mayor of Atlanta: “There is a young lady, very close to here in Georgia, which would make, I think, a formidable candidate “for the vice-president, entrusted Jim Clyburn in March to the” Financial Times “. Clyburn wants a black “VP”, but finds that the other Georgian candidate, Stacey Abrams, lacks experience. Or maybe, but he doesn’t say it, that she’s too left for Joe.

10. Fifty

The age of a vice president shouldn’t matter that much. Except when the presidential candidate is Joe Biden, a man who would break presidential old age records, taking office at an older age than Ronald Reagan when he left the White House. Suddenly, the 50-year-old Keisha Lance Bottoms becomes an asset: not too old to take over from Biden, who many believe he would only serve one term, but experienced enough to be considered capable of taking over at the foot survey.

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