Joss Whedon

Joss Whedon

Personalities

Joss Whedon is an American producer, director and screenwriter born June 23, 1964 in New York. He is the creator of the television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Firefly, Dollhouse and Marvel: Agents of SHIELD, and founded the Mutant Enemy company. He is also the director of the films Avengers and Avengers: Age of Ultron, both of which are among the ten greatest commercial successes in cinema history, as well as the screenwriter of several comics.

Whedon’s work is characterized by his tongue-in-cheek, self-referential humor and emphasizes metaphors and the second degree. He regularly addresses the themes of feminism, anti-authoritarianism, existentialism and self-sacrifice. For him, history is at the service of the characters and it is the paths and evolution of these that are at the center of his works.

Biography

Youth

Born in New York, Joseph Hill Whedon is the son of Tom Whedon, writer of television series in the 1970s and 1980s, and Lee Stearns, professor of history. His grandfather is John Whedon who was a screenwriter for sitcoms such as The Donna Reed Show and Leave It to Beaver in the 1950s. He has two older brothers, Samuel and Matthew, and two younger brothers, Jed and Zack2. His parents divorced when he was nine years old and he lived with his father then but spent the summers with his mother3. In college, he spent two years in England, at Winchester College, before returning to the United States4. He studied at Wesleyan University and graduated in 1987. At university, he was strongly influenced by Jeanine Basinger, his professor of film studies5.

Beginnings as a screenwriter (1980s-1990s)

Whedon leaves for Los Angeles and begins working on the Roseanne series, then on the Parenthood series. Finally, in 1992, Joss Whedon is in the credits of the film Buffy, slayer of vampires, as a screenwriter. But this movie doesn’t fit Whedon’s vision. Director Fran Rubel Kuzui revamps his script to make it lighter, closer to a teenage comedy, while he had written it in such a way as to highlight the horrific side and the emotions. He is also very disappointed with Donald Sutherland’s attitude on the set. The film is both a critical and a commercial failure. He then worked as a script doctor, rewriting in an uncredited way dialogues by Guet-Apens (1994), Speed ​​(1994), Mort ou vive (1995), Waterworld (1995) and Twister (1996), a very lucrative work but which does not satisfy him7. He nevertheless appreciates his work on Speed, a film for which he writes almost all the dialogues8.

In 1995, he co-wrote, with John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Joe Ranft, Pete Docter, Joel Cohen and Alec Sokolow, of the animated film Toy Story, for which he was nominated for the Oscar for best original screenplay. In 1997, he wrote the screenplay for Alien, The Resurrection, considering this work a blessing as he is a great admirer of the first two films of the Alien saga. But he considers the realization of Jean-Pierre Jeunet as a betrayal and this new disappointment pushes him to work on a project over which he will be able to have total creative control, the series Buffy the vampire slayer.

In 1998, Whedon wrote the song My Lullaby (My song of hope) for the cartoon The Lion King 2. Subsequently, he participated in the writing of the scripts for Titan AE (2000), X-Men (2000) and Atlantis, the Lost Empire (2001) but very little of his work on these three films is finally preserved (notably for X-Men where only two lines of dialogue he wrote are preserved) 11. Long associated with the film project to adapt the adventures of Wonder Woman, Whedon, who was to produce and direct the film finally abandons him due to artistic disagreements with the Warner Bros. company, the two parties having failed to agree on a scenario.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel (1997-2004)

Never having given up on Buffy’s idea, Whedon is preparing a television version. Instead of repeating the story told in the film, Whedon decides that the series begins when the film ends: Buffy leaves Los Angeles after her school fire and comes to settle in the city of Sunnydale in California. A pilot is filmed, with actress Riff Regan as Willow Rosenberg. When the pilot is shot again, Alyson Hannigan gets the part. In 1997, to fill a gap in the schedule of the American television network The WB, Buffy the vampire slayer was scheduled for a half-season of 12 episodes. The success is immediate and the series can continue. It airs for five years on The WB, then for two more years on UPN.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer has acquired cult status13 and has influenced other series such as Charmed, Alias3, Doctor Who in its 2000s version14 and Supernatural15. It is widely studied academically for its influential themes and impact on popular culture, and its popularity continues for several years after its discontinuation.

In 1999, Whedon and David Greenwalt released the character of Angel from the Buffy the Vampire Slayer series and dedicated a five-season spinoff series to him, also on The WB. Many times Angel returns in the Buffy the Vampire Slayer series for a few episodes, as well as some Buffy characters are found in the Angel series. Seen initially as a goofy Buffy the Vampire Slayer17 spinoff, Angel found his own path to recognition through his darker, more grown-up tone.

Firefly and Serenity (2002-2006)

In 2002, Whedon created Firefly, a science fiction series inspired by the era of the Civil War, of which he composed the credits19. The American television channel FOX does not broadcast the series in the order planned and stops it after twelve episodes20. In addition to these twelve episodes, there are three additional non-broadcast episodes19 for a total of fifteen episodes. Despite the premature end of the series, Firefly is now considered a cult series13.

The good sales of DVD sets from the series help finance the film Serenity, written and directed by Whedon, which takes up the plot of Firefly. Serenity was a commercial failure but received good reviews21 and won the Hugo award for best feature film and the Nebula award for best screenplay in 2006.

Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog and Dollhouse (2008-2011)

In 2008, Whedon wrote and directed Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, a web-series of three mini-episodes (totaling 42 minutes) which stages the “professional” and romantic rivalry in the form of a musical. between a supervillain, Dr. Horrible, and a superhero, Captain Hammer. Whedon demonstrates with this series, produced during the strike of the Writers Guild of America, that a quality project can be produced with little means, using the Internet and thus bypassing the system of the major television and film studios22. This series is available free on the Internet.

In 2009, Dollhouse, the new series of Whedon with Eliza Dushku in the lead role, is programmed on Fox. In Dollhouse, men and women are programmed to fulfill specific secret missions and each time they are programmed with a new personality, different abilities and memories. After each mission, their memories are erased and they return to the secret laboratory named Dollhouse (“dollhouse”). In this strange universe, Echo, a young “doll”, sees her memories resurface little by little. This series lasts two seasons before being canceled for lack of audience, Whedon regretting after the fact that he could not explore the theme of sexuality as he wished because of the reluctance of the leaders of Fox on this subject.

Blockbuster director (2010s)

Whedon then writes with his friend Drew Goddard the screenplay for The Cabin in the Woods, with the idea of ​​revitalizing the slasher genre while making a satire of gore24 cinema. Whedon is producing the film and Goddard is directing it. Although shot in 2009, it did not come out in theaters until 2012 because of the setbacks encountered by its initial distributor25 and was very well received by critics26.

Since the takeover of Marvel Entertainment by The Walt Disney Company, the policy for managing film adaptations has changed somewhat; after The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man 2, Thor and Captain America in three years, the concept The Avengers conceived in April 2005 by the president of Marvel Studios Avi Arad, comes to an end with the movie Avengers shot from April 25, 2011 and which was released on Wednesday, April 25, 2012. Whedon is offered a turning point in his career by directing Avengers, one of the biggest American blockbusters of the year 2012. Avengers is, at its release, the third biggest commercial success of the history of cinema27 and has received very good reviews28, although Whedon himself considers it imperfect and “loosely structured” 29.

After this super-production, Whedon returns to the world of independent film with Much Ado About Nothing, a modern adaptation of the play of the same name by William Shakespeare. Whedon shot this black-and-white film over a two-week period at his Santa Monica residence, taking advantage of his vacations between filming and editing Avengers and surrounding himself with actors close to him.30

Whedon, however, remains in the Marvel universe by signing a contract with Marvel Studios by which he is engaged to create the television series Marvel: Agents of SHIELD, of which he directs the pilot of the first season broadcast from September 2013, and for write and direct the film Avengers: Age of Ultron, released in April 2015.31 Whedon is satisfied with his second Marvel feature film, but comes out exhausted from production, saying it is “the hardest job ever. ‘he never performed’ 32. He considers it very unlikely that he will continue to devote himself to the Marvel universe, preferring to turn to more personal projects in the future. Avengers: Age of Ultron enjoyed commercial success almost comparable to that of Avengers27 and obtained generally favorable reviews but nevertheless less flattering than the first installment34.

In March 2017, he was approached to write the screenplay and direct the film Batgirl, set in the DC Cinematographic Universe and not due for release before 202035. Two months later, he replaced director Zack Snyder, who was affected by a personal drama, to complete the post-production and the shooting of possible additional scenes from the film Justice League, still in the DC36 universe. In August 2017, the studio announced that he would be credited as a screenwriter for his work. He left the Batgirl film project in February 2018, saying that “it took him several months to realize he had no story.” 38 ”

In 2018, he is preparing his return to television, working on a new fantasy series, called The Nevers, which will be broadcast on cable channel HBO.

Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog and Dollhouse (2008-2011)

In 2008, Whedon wrote and directed Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, a web-series of three mini-episodes (totaling 42 minutes) which stages the “professional” and romantic rivalry in the form of a musical. between a supervillain, Dr. Horrible, and a superhero, Captain Hammer. Whedon demonstrates with this series, produced during the strike of the Writers Guild of America, that a quality project can be produced with little means, using the Internet and thus bypassing the system of the major television and film studios22. This series is available free on the Internet.

In 2009, Dollhouse, the new series of Whedon with Eliza Dushku in the lead role, is programmed on Fox. In Dollhouse, men and women are programmed to fulfill specific secret missions and each time they are programmed with a new personality, different abilities and memories. After each mission, their memories are erased and they return to the secret laboratory named Dollhouse (“dollhouse”). In this strange universe, Echo, a young “doll”, sees her memories resurface little by little. This series lasts two seasons before being canceled for lack of audience, Whedon regretting after the fact that he could not explore the theme of sexuality as he wished because of the reluctance of the leaders of Fox on this subject.

Blockbuster director (2010s)

Whedon then writes with his friend Drew Goddard the screenplay for The Cabin in the Woods, with the idea of ​​revitalizing the slasher genre while making a satire of gore24 cinema. Whedon is producing the film and Goddard is directing it. Although shot in 2009, it did not come out in theaters until 2012 because of the setbacks encountered by its initial distributor25 and was very well received by critics26.

Since the takeover of Marvel Entertainment by The Walt Disney Company, the policy for managing film adaptations has changed somewhat; after The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man 2, Thor and Captain America in three years, the concept The Avengers conceived in April 2005 by the president of Marvel Studios Avi Arad, comes to an end with the movie Avengers shot from April 25, 2011 and which was released on Wednesday, April 25, 2012. Whedon is offered a turning point in his career by directing Avengers, one of the biggest American blockbusters of the year 2012. Avengers is, at its release, the third biggest commercial success of the history of cinema27 and has received very good reviews28, although Whedon himself considers it imperfect and “loosely structured” 29.

After this super-production, Whedon returns to the world of independent film with Much Ado About Nothing, a modern adaptation of the play of the same name by William Shakespeare. Whedon shot this black-and-white film over a two-week period at his Santa Monica residence, taking advantage of his vacations between filming and editing Avengers and surrounding himself with actors close to him.30

Whedon, however, remains in the Marvel universe by signing a contract with Marvel Studios by which he is engaged to create the television series Marvel: Agents of SHIELD, of which he directs the pilot of the first season broadcast from September 2013, and for write and direct the film Avengers: Age of Ultron, released in April 2015.31 Whedon is satisfied with his second Marvel feature film, but comes out exhausted from production, saying it is “the hardest job ever. ‘he never performed’ 32. He considers it very unlikely that he will continue to devote himself to the Marvel universe, preferring to turn to more personal projects in the future. Avengers: Age of Ultron enjoyed commercial success almost comparable to that of Avengers27 and obtained generally favorable reviews but nevertheless less flattering than the first installment34.

In March 2017, he was approached to write the screenplay and direct the film Batgirl, set in the DC Cinematographic Universe and not due for release before 202035. Two months later, he replaced director Zack Snyder, who was affected by a personal drama, to complete the post-production and the shooting of possible additional scenes from the film Justice League, still in the DC36 universe. In August 2017, the studio announced that he would be credited as a screenwriter for his work. He left the Batgirl film project in February 2018, saying that “it took him several months to realize he had no story.” 38 ”

In 2018, he is preparing his return to television, working on a new fantasy series, called The Nevers, which will be broadcast on cable channel HBO.

Comics

Whedon wrote the Fray (2001) miniseries for Dark Horse Comics, an expansion to the Buffy the Vampire Slayer series featuring the Vampire Slayer from a future where the creatures of the night are believed to have disappeared40.

He wrote from 2004 to 2007 Astonishing X-Men at Marvel Comics, the series drawn by John Cassaday41.

Whedon oversaw the eighth season of Buffy. Published by Dark Horse Comics in the United States from 2007 to 2011 and by Fusion Comics in France, this comic is the continuation of the television series stopped since June 2003. A season consists of 40 issues. In France, a comic strip brings together six numbers. The ninth season was released from September 2011 to August 2013 in the United States and is a direct sequel to the previous season42. This comic book series ended in 2018 with the release of a twelfth season.

Whedon also worked on a comic book sequel to the television series Angel, named Angel: After the Fall, published by IDW in the US from 2007 to 2011. Along with the Buffy comics, Whedon has been releasing Angel & Faith since 2011. , a new comic whose story focuses on the collaboration of vampire and Vampire Slayer Faith Lehane after the events of Buffy Season Eight.

Private life

Joss Whedon married in 1995 with Kai Cole, architect and co-founder with him of the production company Bellwether Pictures. They have two children: a son (Arden) born in 2003 and a daughter (Squire) born in 200543. The couple separated in 2012, the divorce was not formalized until 201644. In 2017, Cole claimed that Whedon was unfaithful during their marriage on several occasions45.

In 2013, he admitted that he suffered from a work addiction which was sometimes a problem for him46. He often defines himself as a humanist atheist47. He is also a convinced feminist48.

On the political level, he spoke out against both socialism and capitalism, explaining “that in the end these two systems do not work” 49. He declared himself in favor of Barack Obama during the campaign for the American presidential election of 2012 and ridiculed Mitt Romney by explaining that his program had all the characteristics to promote a zombie apocalypse50.

During the campaign for the 2016 US presidential election, he founded PAC Save the Day, which funds the campaign of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton51.

Charges of Abusive Behavior

In August 2020, Joss Whedon was accused by actor Ray Fisher, the interpreter of Cyborg in the DC Cinematic Universe, of abusive behavior 52. He is joined by his colleagues Jason Momoa and Kiersey Clemons who support his complaints. In December 2020, actress Gal Gadot reveals her bad experiences with the director during the Justice League reshoots.

In February 2021, actresses Charisma Carpenter, Amber Benson, Michelle Trachtenberg and Sarah Michelle Gellar also denounce the abusive behavior of Joss Whedon during the filming of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel53.

Charisma Carpenter shares her story with Whedon on Twitter “He’s created hostile and toxic work environments since early in his career. He kept threatening to fire me, which can be devastating for a woman’s self-esteem. young actress. Or to call me ‘fat’ in front of colleagues when I was four months pregnant and weighed 57 kg. He was mean and fierce, openly denigrating others, making some hate others and compete for his approval. He asked me if I wanted to keep my child and manipulated my femininity and my faith against me. He meticulously attacked my personality, my religious beliefs, accused me of sabotage the show, then unceremoniously fired me the season after I gave birth. ”

Screenwriter Jose Molina who worked on the Firefly series tweeted in support of actress Amber Benson that Whedon liked to make women writers cry on the series “He thought being bad was funny. Making writers cry during a session of notes was particularly hysterical. In fact, he liked to brag about the time he made a writer cry twice in a meeting. “54.

In March 2021, Deborah Snyder, producer of several DC Comics films, revealed that she had spoken to Warner Bros. executives about an incident involving Whedon during the Justice League reshoots.

An article from The Hollywood Reporter reveals that there have been high tensions between Gal Gadot and Whedon over the Justice League reshoots. It is stated that the director took pleasure in belittling the actress and forcing her to say lines that she hated and even came to threaten her career.

Style, themes and influence

Whedon regularly introduces a symbolic level into his stories, using metaphors to make his audience reflect on the subtext going beyond the primary meaning of the story and which gives it its true strength. His dialogues are imbued with a slang he invented, Slayer Slang, which is made up of portfolios, a mixture or association between two words to create a third, or even an expression created from scratch. They are also characterized by pervasive humor and self-reference57. The simultaneous deconstruction and reconstruction of clichés and moral icons are also part of its hallmarks57.

The protagonists of Joss Whedon’s stories are often very witty and capable of the most heroic deeds, but at the same time are “deliciously flawed”, fallible, and entangled in their emotional contradictions and paradoxes58. The long moral development of antiheroes, such as Spike or Jayne Cobb, which leads them to redemption is a recurring motif in his work59. Whedon focuses most of the time on a group of characters, a community led by a solitary hero and united by a common goal, of which unity is the main force57. He has regularly been criticized, or praised, for his penchant for killing his characters, even if it is mainly secondary characters who pay the price57, but these deaths are used in order to advance the narrative arc and change the nature or the view of things of its main characters60.

Among the themes developed repeatedly by Joss Whedon are feminism and gender equality, which is in chronological order the first he has dealt with in the series Buffy the Vampire Slayer55; anti-authoritarianism57; the importance of the community, of the family that one chooses for oneself and of collaboration between human beings55; the different definitions and paths of heroism through the imperfections of its characters55 and which can lead to self-sacrifice58; and sexuality in its different forms and identities61. Whedon often questions what makes us human beings, the nature of our identity55 and positions himself in the philosophy of existentialism, in particular as it was stated by Jean-Paul Sartre62. Whedon considers Nausea the most important book he has read, and devoted the Identified Flying Object episode of Firefly to affirming this influence.63,59

Apart from Sartre, Whedon is also greatly influenced by the literary works of William Shakespeare64. He regularly organizes readings of Shakespeare’s plays at his home with actors who are in his entourage and has produced a modern adaptation of the play Much Ado About Nothing.

Among his other influences, we can cite the novels of Ray Bradbury, Stephen King and Frank Herbert65, the musicals of Stephen Sondheim3 or even Stan Lee, Tim Burton and the Monty Python66. He cites as his five favorite films: The Matrix (1999), Once Upon a Time in the West (1968), Les Ensorcelés (1952), Magnolia (1999) and Le Bouffon du roi (1955).

Filmography

Director

Cinema

  • 2005: Serenity
  • 2012: Avengers (Marvel’s The Avengers)
  • 2013: Much Ado About Nothing
  • 2015: Avengers: Age of Ultron
  • 2017: Justice League

TV shows

  • 1997 to 2003: Buffy the vampire slayer (20 episodes: The Manuscript, The Metamorphosis of Buffy, Lie, Innocence, part 2, Acathla (in two parts), Anne, The Christmas Sun, The Two Faces, The Ceremony (in two parts), Disappearances on Campus, Dead silence, A ghost, part 2, Nightmare, Blood Ties, Orphans, The Apocalypse, Let the Show Begin and The End of Times, part 2)
  • 1999 to 2004: Angel (6 episodes: Welcome to Los Angeles, Untouchable, Behind the Scenes of Eternity, The Magic Bottle, Conviction and A Hole in the World)
  • 2002: Firefly (3 episodes: The New Passengers, The Train Attack and Identified Flying Object)
  • 2007: The Office (2 episodes)
  • 2009: Dollhouse (3 episodes)
  • 2010: Glee (1 episode: Dream On)
  • 2013: Marvel: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (pilot episode)

Scriptwriter

Cinema

  • 1992: Buffy, Buffy the Vampire Slayer by Fran Rubel Kuzui
  • 1995: Toy Story by John Lasseter
  • 1997: Alien, la résurrection (Alien Resurrection) by Jean-Pierre Jeunet
  • 2000: Titan A.E. by Don Bluth and Gary Goldman
  • 2001: Atlantis, the Lost Empire (Atlantis, the Lost Empire) by Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise
  • 2005: Serenity of himself
  • 2012: The Cabin in the Woods by Drew Goddard
  • 2012: Avengers (Marvel’s The Avengers) of himself
  • 2013: Much Ado About Nothing by himself
  • 2014: In Your Eyes by Brin Hill
  • 2015: Avengers: Age of Ultron (Avengers: Age of Ultron) by himself
  • 2017: Justice League of himself (credited for his work in reshoots and postproduction)

Television

  • 1989: Roseanne (4 episodes)
  • 1990: Parenthood (3 episodes)
  • 1997 to 2003: Buffy the Vampire Slayer (26 episodes: Welcome to Sunnydale (in two parts), Billy (in collaboration), Missing (in collaboration), The Manuscript, The Metamorphosis of Buffy, Lie, The Fiancé (in collaboration) , Innocence, part 2, Acathla (in two parts), Anne, The Christmas Sun, The Two Faces, The Ceremony (in two parts), Disappearances on campus, A dead silence, A ghost, part 2, Nightmare, Blood Ties, Orphans, The Apocalypse, Let the Show Begin, Redemption and The End of Times, part 2)
  • 1999 to 2004: Angel (8 episodes: Welcome to Los Angeles (in collaboration), Sanctuary (in collaboration), Behind the Scenes of Eternity, The Magic Bottle, Conviction, Maleficent Puppets (in collaboration), A Hole in the World and L’Ultime Combat – in collaboration)
  • 2002 and 2003: Firefly (5 episodes: The New Passengers, The Train Attack, The Commandant’s Wife, The Message and Identified Flying Object)
  • 2009 and 2010: Dollhouse (5 episodes)
  • 2013: Marvel: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (pilot episode)
    Web series
  • 2008: Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog (writer and director)
  • 2012: Husbands, season 2 (actor)
    Composer
    2013: Much Ado About Nothing

Awards

This section recaps the main awards and nominations obtained by Joss Whedon. For a more complete list, refer to the Internet Movie Database72.

  • 1996: Annie Award for Best Screenplay for Toy Story (shared with Andrew Stanton, Joel Cohen and Alec Sokolow)
  • 2005: SFX Award for Best Director for Serenity
  • 2006: Hugo Award for best feature film for Serenity
  • 2006: Nebula Award for Best Screenplay for Serenity
  • 2006: Eisner Award for Best Series for Astonishing X-Men (with John Cassaday)
  • 2008: Eisner Award for Best New Series for Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Season Eight and Best Online Comic for Sugarshock! (with Fábio Moon)
  • 2009: Hugo Award for Best Short Film for Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog (shared with Zack Whedon, Jed Whedon and Maurissa Tancharoen)
  • 2009: Primetime Emmy Award for Best Special for Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog (shared with Michael Boretz and David M. Burns)
  • 2010: Vanguard Award at the PGA Awards
  • 2013: Saturn Award for Best Director for Avengers
  • 2013: Hugo Award for Best Feature Film for Avengers
  • 2013: Fangoria Horror Hall of Fame at the Fangoria Chainsaw Awards
  • 2013: Fangoria Chainsaw Award for Best Screenplay for The Cabin in the Woods (shared with Drew Goddard)
  • 2013: SFX Award for Best Director for Avengers

Appointments

  • 1996: Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for Toy Story
  • 1996: Saturn Award for Best Screenplay for Toy Story
  • 1996: Hugo Award for Best Film for Toy Story
  • 1999: Annie Award for Best Music in an Animated Film for The Lion King 2 for the song My Lullaby
  • 2000: Primetime Emmy Award for Best Screenplay for a Dramatic Television Series for the episode Deadly Silence from Buffy the Vampire Slayer
  • 2000: Bram Stoker Award for Best Screenplay for the episode A Deadly Silence by Buffy the Vampire Slayer
  • 2002: Nebula Award for Best Screenplay for the episode Orphans of Buffy the Vampire Slayer
  • 2002: Hugo Award for Best Picture for the episode The Show Begins of Buffy the Vampire Slayer
  • 2003: Nebula Award for Best Screenplay for the episode The Show Begins of Buffy the Vampire Slayer
  • 2003: Hugo Award for Best Short Film for Angel’s Behind the Scenes of Eternity and Firefly’s New Passengers episode
  • 2004: Hugo Award for best short film for the episode The End of Time, part 2 of Buffy the vampire slayer and the episode The Message from Firefly
  • 2005: Hugo Award for best short film for the episode Angel’s Ultimate Fight and Angel’s Maleficent Puppets
  • 2010: Hugo Award for Best Short Film for the Los Angeles 2019 episode of Dollhouse
  • 2013: Saturn Award for Best Screenplay for Avengers and The Cabin in the Woods
  • 2013: Hugo Award for best feature film for La Cabane dans les bois
  • 2013: Empire Award for Best Director for Avengers
  • 2013: Ray-Bradbury Award for Best Screenplay for Avengers and The Cabin in the Woods
  • 2016: Hugo Award for Best Picture for Avengers: Age of Ultron

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