Gavin Newsom

Gavin Newsom : Biography, Private life, works

Personalities

Gavin Newsom, born October 10, 1967 in San Francisco, is an American politician, member of the Democratic Party and governor of California since 2019. After making his fortune in the ownership of restaurants and hotels, he was mayor of San Francisco from 2004 to 2011 and Lieutenant Governor of California from 2011 to 2019.

In the 2018 election, Newsom was elected state governor by 60.2% of the vote against John H. Cox, the Republican Party candidate, who won 39.8% of the vote, succeeding Jerry Brown. His political program, entitled California Dream and placing him on the left of his party, is oriented towards health, education and housing.

Gavin Newsom Biography

Youth and training

Of Irish origin through one of his great-grandparents, Gavin Newsom is the son of William Alfred Newsom III (1934-2018), judge and administrator of the Getty family conglomerate, and Tessa Menzies (1946-2002).

His parents separated in 1969 and divorced in 1972. He lived with his father until 1977, then with his mother. In 1985, he graduated from Redwood High School in Larkspur. In 1989, at the University of Santa Clara, he obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science.

Beginning of professional career

After having started by selling pediatric orthoses, then after a succession of several small jobs, Gavin Newson knows the economic success with the foundation in 1991 of the PlumpJack group, thanks to the financial assistance of a friend of his family, Gordon Getty, one of the richest Americans. This business is growing rapidly, to have around 700 employees. He sold it in 2004 when he became mayor of San Francisco.

Mayor of San Francisco

Elected mayor of San Francisco in 2003 with 52.81% of the votes on a poverty reduction program, he took office on January 8, 2004. He was re-elected in 2007 with around 73.66% of the votes1.

He attracted attention in February 2004 when he ordered civil status officers to modify marriage certificates to accept same-sex unions, in contravention of Bill 22 passed by Californians in 2000. From February 12 to March 11, around 4,000 gay and gay couples were married in San Francisco until a California Supreme Court order made the unions null and void.

To the criticisms of the senator and former mayor of San Francisco Dianne Feinstein judging that these unions are “too much, too fast, too soon” (too, too fast, too soon), Newson answers: “It is no longer acceptable for politicians to come to you every electoral cycle and ask you for money and then turn around and say, “It is too much, too soon.” ”

(It is no longer acceptable for politicians to come and ask you for money every election campaign, then walk away saying “it’s too much, too soon”)
On May 17, 2008, a California Supreme Court ruling ruled that the ban on gay marriage is discriminatory. Gavin Newsom comments: “It’s a big day for San Francisco” 2.

Gavin Newsom also wants to make San Francisco “the recycling capital, the haven of green buildings, […] and the spearhead of the development of solar energy” 3.

Running for Governor of California

On April 21, 2009, Gavin Newsom announced his candidacy for the election for the post of governor of California in November 20104. A long delay in the polls for the Democratic nomination against ex-governor Jerry Brown led him to resign. October 2009, even before the latter had officially made an official nomination.

Lieutenant Governor of California

Finally, he becomes Jerry Brown’s co-lister (ie runs for lieutenant-governor) and is elected on November 2, 2010. He takes office alongside Jerry Brown on January 10, 2011. The same day, he resigns from his office as mayor of San Francisco.

Governor of California

Jerry Brown being ineligible for a third term, Gavin Newsom announced in 2015 on social networks his intention to run for his succession in 2018. At the end of the election of November 6, 2018, he was elected governor with 59.3 % against Republican candidate John H. Cox. He is sworn in and takes office on January 7, 2019.

On September 9, 2019, he passed Decree SB-276 limiting exemptions from compulsory vaccination at school entry5, arousing the anger of antivaxx6.

In August 2020, after the anti-racist protests following the death of George Floyd, he passed a law requiring students at 23 state universities to take an ethnic studies course to graduate. The management of Cal State – the name of the university network – was opposed to the measure, believing it to be a problematic interference in university affairs.

Private life

Gavin Newsom married in 2001 Kimberly Guilfoyle, former model and assistant district attorney in San Francisco, then forensic expert on Court TV, CNN and MSNBC (she has worked for Fox News since), and current partner of Donald Trump, Jr. The couple jointly introduced a divorce petition on January 7, 2005, citing difficulties due to their respective careers, on two opposing political sides. In 2006, a few months’ affair with actress Sofia Milos, a prominent follower of the Church of Scientology, gave rise to media controversy; so did a brief affair with 20-year-old student and model Britannie Mountz. On January 1, 2007, Gavin Newsom confirmed at a press conference that he had an affair in 2005 with the wife of his campaign leader, Alex Tourk, who had resigned the day before, fueling rumors.

Gavin Newsom married actress Jennifer Siebel on July 26, 2008 in Stevensville, MT. They have four children. Between 2011 and 2019 the family resided in Kentfield and since early 2019 in Fair Oaks, near Sacramento.

Gavin Newsom is a cousin of harpist Joanna Newsom.

Works

He is the author of the book Citizenville, written with the American writer Lisa Dickey, published in 2013.

Gavin Newsom, Governor of California, threatened with dismissal proceedings

Gavin Newsom, Governor of California, threatened with dismissal proceedings The petition to request the “recall” of the Democratic governor has reached the necessary number of signatures. California could therefore, in the coming months, have to organize a referendum to replace Newsom, elected in 2018. "The great revocation circus is back in California, with its clowns, Mr. Loyal and seasoned politicians," columnist George Skelton jokes in the columns of the Los Angeles Times. It must be said that California is not at its first attempt, underlines the columnist, who recalls “that eighteen years ago, the same circus had seen 'Terminator' triumph”, ie the actor Arnold Schwarzenegger, reconverted into politics on the Republican side, “facing the Democratic governor of the time, Gray Davis”, also dismissed following a “recall” procedure. In a second article, the Los Angeles daily details the reasons why the Golden State [“golden state”, nickname of California] finds itself again in the same situation. Fueled by discontent over Governor Gavin Newsom's handling of the pandemic, the petition to have his dismissal garnered more than 1.5 million signatures, the necessary threshold - which corresponds to 12% of voters in the previous election - to be able to organize a referendum ”, explains the Californian newspaper. California voters, the paper continued, "will have a little time to retract and request that their name be removed from this recall petition." If at the end of this period, which should last a month, the required number of signatures is still met - which is likely - then California will have to hold a referendum to ask voters if they want to remove Gavin Newsom and, if so, who they would like to replace it with. Caytlin Jenner candidate to replace him Republican candidates for his replacement are already in the running, including former transgender Olympian Caitlyn Jenner "or former San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer and Conservative congressman for Sacramento Doug Ose." But the efforts to remove the current governor could well be ultimately doomed to failure, estimates the Los Angeles Times, which recalls that “Gavin Newsom was elected more than comfortably in 2018 and that only 40% of Californians support the procedure reminder targeting him today. Which could prove to be insufficient. ” Same story for columnist George Skelton, who for his part predicts that "the show will be less captivating than in 2003". For him, this whole revocation campaign “will not excite the crowds. Both camps - especially that of the current governor - will shell out millions and Gavin Newsom will eventually emerge victorious from the affair. "

The petition to request the “recall” of the Democratic governor has reached the necessary number of signatures. California could therefore, in the coming months, have to organize a referendum to replace Newsom, elected in 2018.

“The great revocation circus is back in California, with its clowns, Mr. Loyal and seasoned politicians,” columnist George Skelton jokes in the columns of the Los Angeles Times.

It must be said that California is not at its first attempt, underlines the columnist, who recalls “that eighteen years ago, the same circus had seen ‘Terminator’ triumph”, ie the actor Arnold Schwarzenegger, reconverted into politics on the Republican side, “facing the Democratic governor of the time, Gray Davis”, also dismissed following a “recall” procedure.

In a second article, the Los Angeles daily details the reasons why the Golden State [“golden state”, nickname of California] finds itself again in the same situation.

Fueled by discontent over Governor Gavin Newsom’s handling of the pandemic, the petition to have his dismissal garnered more than 1.5 million signatures, the necessary threshold – which corresponds to 12% of voters in the previous election – to be able to organize a referendum ”, explains the Californian newspaper.

California voters, the paper continued, “will have a little time to retract and request that their name be removed from this recall petition.” If at the end of this period, which should last a month, the required number of signatures is still met – which is likely – then California will have to hold a referendum to ask voters if they want to remove Gavin Newsom and, if so, who they would like to replace it with.

Caytlin Jenner candidate to replace him

Republican candidates for his replacement are already in the running, including former transgender Olympian Caitlyn Jenner “or former San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer and Conservative congressman for Sacramento Doug Ose.”

But the efforts to remove the current governor could well be ultimately doomed to failure, estimates the Los Angeles Times, which recalls that “Gavin Newsom was elected more than comfortably in 2018 and that only 40% of Californians support the procedure reminder targeting him today. Which could prove to be insufficient. ”

Same story for columnist George Skelton, who for his part predicts that “the show will be less captivating than in 2003″. For him, this whole revocation campaign “will not excite the crowds. Both camps – especially that of the current governor – will shell out millions and Gavin Newsom will eventually emerge victorious from the affair. ”

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