Carey Mulligan

Carey Mulligan

Personalities

Carey Mulligan [ˈkɛəɹi ˈmʌlɪɡən] 1, born May 28, 1985 in London, is a British actress.

She is revealed by two films in British costume, Pride and Prejudice (2005) and especially

An Education (2009), which earned her the BAFTA for best actress and numerous nominations, including the Golden Globe and the Oscar for best actress.

She confirmed in 2011 in two ambitious independent American dramas: Drive, opposite Ryan Gosling and Shame, carried by the performance of Michael Fassbender.

She played in two big Hollywood productions in 2013: The Magnificent Gatsby and Inside Llewyn Davis.

In 2015, she returned to England to once again headline two films in costume: Far from the Unchained Crowd and The Suffragettes.

She returns to the United States to co-star Mudbound (2017) with Garrett Hedlund and Wildlife – A Burning Season (2018) with Jake Gyllenhaal.

CIVIL STATUS

  • Professions : Actress, Producer
  • Birth name : Carey Hannah Mulligan
  • British nationality
  • Born 28 May 1985 (Westminster, London – England)
  • Age : 35 years old

Biography

Daughter of a hotel manager, Carey Mulligan was born in London in 1985 but spent her early childhood in Germany. From this period dates her first emotions as an actress: at six years old, she took the stage for the first time during a musical comedy offered by her school. Back in the English capital at the age of 8, it was at Woldingham School that she learned the art of the stage and reinforced her passion.

Thanks to her nerve – she wrote directly to the casting director without any real reference – the young girl won her first stripes as an actress with a small role in Pride and Prejudice (2005) by Joe Wright, at only 18 years old. She was more spotted three years later thanks to the adaptation of Chekhov’s Seagull, in which she shared the stage alongside Kristin Scott Thomas and Peter Sarsgaard. The following three years offered the actress the opportunity to improve her skills during various television appearances, such as the series The Amazing Mrs Pritchard and Doctor Who.

But Carey Mulligan’s career took off in 2009 when she gave successively the answer to Johnny Depp in the thriller of the master Michael Mann, Public Enemies then to Natalie Portman in the family drama Brothers, under the direction of Jim Sheridan. The following year, she really became known to the general public with the title role of An Education, where her moving performance was crowned with the best actress award at the BAFTAs and an Oscar nomination. For the occasion, she meets Peter Sarsgaard.

The actress then continued her career in a big production, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps by Oliver Stone, where she rubbed shoulders with Michael Douglas and Shia LaBeouf. Six years after Pride and Prejudice, she reunites with Keira Knightley in Never Let Me Go where she plays a young girl in love confronted with a terrible reality. In love, she is also in the very acclaimed Drive with Ryan Gosling who makes her head spin.

Her career now seems to be well and truly launched since it is found in the casting of Shame (Steve McQueen (II)), evoking the theme of sexual addiction through the character played by Michael Fassbender, from The Magnificent Gatsby, in which she Headlining alongside Leonardo DiCaprio, as well as Inside Llewyn Davis by Ethan and Joel Coen with Oscar Isaac and Justin Timberlake.

After two years of absence from the cinema, Carey Mulligan returned to the big screen in 2015 with Les Suffragettes directed by Sarah Gavron. In the feature film that traces the true story of British women activists claiming the right to vote in conservative England, the actress stars alongside Meryl Streep and Helena Bonham Carter.

Youth and training

Carey Mulligan was born in London, and spent part of her youth in Germany, Hanover and Düsseldorf. At the age of 6, a performance of the King and I made her want to play in musicals, and at 8 she returned to London2.

Her father is a hotel manager while her mother is a university professor. Around 17-18 years old, she is in conflict with her parents because they prefer her to go to university, when she wants to go to drama school. After the rejection of her application from art school, which she sent in secret, her parents insist that she finish her studies at the university, to have an alternative if her acting career does not start . With hindsight, she nevertheless understood their protective reaction, and subsequently, when they saw that she was making her place in the community, they supported her3.

She studied at Woldingham School in Surrey, where she was introduced to the stage, which became her passion.

Beginnings and revelation (2000s)

She began her career with the role of Kitty Bennett in 2005 in the film adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel, Pride and Prejudice, after writing a letter directly to the production. She appeared the following year in the British series The Amazing Mrs Pritchard.

In 2007, she starred in the play La Mouette, and played a supporting role in Jon Jones’ television drama, Northanger Abbey. That same year, she played the main character in the critically acclaimed episode The Weeping Angels of Doctor Who. She also co-stars in the TV movie My Boy Jack, with Daniel Radcliffe and Kim Cattrall.

The year 2009 was the year of revelation: she participated in her first Hollywood production, the historical thriller Public Enemies, by Michael Mann, led by Johnny Depp and Marion Cotillard. And rubs shoulders with Tobey Maguire, Natalie Portman and Jake Gyllenhaal for the drama Brothers, by Jim Sheridan.

But above all, she is the headliner of the British independent drama An Education, which earned her a British Academy Film Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role in 2010, as well as an Oscar nomination for Best Actress. That same year, she reunited with Keira Knightley for the drama Auprès de moi toujours, which they shared the poster with a young Andrew Garfield.

She concludes this year by singing on the title of Belle and Sebastian, Write About Love, from the album of the same title.

Confirmation (2010s)

Now a leading actress, she continues to bet on great filmmakers: after Wall Street: Money never sleeps, by Oliver Stone, she continues with the action thriller Drive, by Nicolas Winding Refn: a great critical success and commercial who reveals it, alongside the now superstar Ryan Gosling. She indeed plays the role of Irene, a modest and rather introverted girl. The same year, she completely changed her register playing the role of Sissy in the independent drama Shame, directed by Steve McQueen, the depressed sister of a sex addict with suicidal tendencies.

In 2013, she played Daisy Buchanan, in the film adaptation of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald by Baz Luhrmann, alongside Leonardo DiCaprio and Tobey Maguire.

The same year, she took the lead female role of Inside Llewyn Davis, Joel and Ethan Coen. A huge critical success.

In 2015, she returned to British cinema as the heroine of two historical dramas: Far from the Unchained Crowd, by Thomas Vinterberg, and Les Suffragettes, by Sarah Gavron.

Private life

In 2009, she began a romantic relationship with actor Shia LaBeouf, met on the set of the film Wall Street: Money never sleeps4; they separate at the end of the following year.

Filmography

Cinema

  • 2005: Pride & Prejudice by Joe Wright: Kitty Bennet
  • 2007: And When Did You Last See Your Father? Anand Tucker: Rachel
  • 2009: For the Love of Bennett (The Greatest) by Shana Feste: Rose
  • 2009: An Education by Lone Scherfig: Jenny
  • 2009: Public Enemies by Michael Mann: Carol Slayman
  • 2009: Jim Sheridan Brothers: Cassie Willis
  • 2010: Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps) by Oliver Stone: Winnie Gekko
  • 2010: Never Let Me Go by Mark Romanek: Kathy
  • 2011: Drive by Nicolas Winding Refn: Irene
  • 2011: Steve McQueen’s Shame: Sissy
  • 2013: The Great Gatsby by Baz Luhrmann: Daisy Buchanan
  • 2013: Inside Llewyn Davis by Joel and Ethan Coen: Jean Berkey
  • 2015: Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Vinterberg: Bathsheba Everdene
  • 2015: Les Suffragettes (Suffragette) by Sarah Gavron: Maud Watts
  • 2017: Dee Rees’ Mudbound: Laura McAllan
  • 2018: Wildlife – Une saison ardente (Wildlife) by Paul Dano: Jeanette Brinson
  • 2020: Promising Young Woman by Emerald Fennell: Cassandra “Cassie” Thomas
  • 2021: The Dig by Simon Stone: Edith Pretty

Television

  • 2005: Bleak House (miniseries): Ada Clare
  • 2006: Miss Marple: Le Mystère de Sittaford (Agatha Christie Marple: The Sittaford Mystery) by Paul Unwin: Violet Willett
  • 2006: The Amazing Mrs Pritchard (mini-series): Emily Pritchard
  • 2006-2007: Scotland Yard, Crimes on the Thames (Trial & Retribution) (TV series, 2 episodes): Emily Harrogate
  • 2007: Waking the Dead (TV series, 2 episodes): Sister Bridgid
  • 2007: Northanger Abbey by Jon Jones: Isabella Thorpe
  • 2007: Doctor Who (TV series, 1 episode): Sally Sparrow
  • 2007: Mon fils Jack (My Boy Jack) by Brian Kirk: Elsie Kipling
  • 2014: The Spoils of Babylon: Voices of Lady Anne York
  • 2018: Collateral (miniseries, 4 episodes): Inspector Kip Glaspie

Theater

  • 2008: The Seagull5
  • 2011: Through A Glass Darkly, by David Leveaux. Adaptation of the film Through the Looking Glass by Ingmar Bergman. Performance at the New York Theater Workshop6.
  • 2018: Girls and Boys, by Dennis Kelly and directed by Lindsey Turner. The first performances took place at the Royal Court Theater in London7.

Awards

  • 2009: British Independent Film Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2009: Toronto Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2009: Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress and Most Promising Actor for An Education
  • 2009: Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2009: Hollywood Film Festival: Hollywood Film Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2009: Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2009: National Board of Review Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2010: BAFTA Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2010: Central Ohio Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress and Most Promising Artist for An Education
  • 2010: London Film Critics Circle Award for Best British Actress for An Education
  • 2010: Santa Barbara International Film Festival: Virtuoso Prize for An Education
  • 2010: Vancouver Film Critics Circle Awards for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2010: British Independent Film Award for Best Actress for Never Let Me Go
  • 2011: Palm Springs International Film Festival: Best Hope for Never Let Me Go and Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps
  • 2011: Hollywood Film Festival: Hollywood Film Award for Best Supporting Actress for Drive and Shame
  • 2015: Hollywood Film Festival: Hollywood Actress Award for The Suffragettes

Appointments

  • 2009: Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2009: New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2009: San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2009: Satellite Award for Best Actress in a Dramatic Film for An Education
  • 2010: BAFTA Awards: Rising Star Award for Education
  • 2010: Critics Choice Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2010: Empire Award for Best Actress and Most Promising Actor for An Education
  • 2010: Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2010: Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Drama for An Education
  • 2010: Oscar for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2010: Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress and Best Cast for An Education
  • 2010: London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2010: Chlotrudis Award for Best Actress for An Education
  • 2010: Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress for Never Let Me Go
  • 2010: San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress for Never Let Me Go
  • 2011: Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress for Never Let Me Go
  • 2011: Saturn Award for Best Actress for Never Let Me Go
  • 2011: British Independent Film Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2011: Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2011: Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2011: New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2011: San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2011: Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2011: Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2012: Central Ohio Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2012: Critics Choice Award for Best Supporting Actress for Shame
  • 2012: Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress for Shame
  • 2012: London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress for Drive and Shame
  • 2012: BAFTA Award for Best Actress for Drive
  • 2012: Empire Award for Best Actress for Drive
  • 2021: Golden Globes for Best Actress in a Drama for Promising Young Woman 9
  • 2021: Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress for Promising Young Woman 10
  • 2021: Oscar for Best Actress for Promising Young Woman

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